At Pittsburgh Pipe we encourage and require our employees to follow safety procedures to not only ensure they as individuals are safe, but that our entire workforce is safe. Being involved in the underground utility contracting world requires a great respect for safety, and although we may not be on the job site with our customers, we want them to be protected. Trench and excavation work are a major component for any underground utility contractor, and it also holds the title of one of the most dangerous construction operations.
Staying safe on the job is key, and there are a few things you can do to ensure that your entire team ends the day safely.

1. Always have a safety plan in place. There is nothing more dangerous than unorganized chaos, but when an accident happens that will be the result without a plan. Ensure that everyone on your team, not just the managers know what to do in case of an emergency. Who will be contacting emergency rescue teams and medics, what roles will each employees play in the recovery? These are all things that should be planned ahead.
2. Don’t try to cut corners when it comes to shoring up trenches, no matter the size of the trench there will be a risk of a cave-in which can become deadly. A trench protective system can become the difference between life and death for your team.

3. Attend training classes. There are many organizations who offer safety training courses to those in the utility contracting industry; from excavation safety to confined space entry there are safety professional on hand to share the best practices.

4. Remember, the best way to stay safe is prevention. Ensuring that every step has been made and every procedure followed will allow for your team to work in a safe environment.

We are partnered with the National Utility Contractors Association, an organization who works hand in hand with utility contractors to ensure that their working environment is safe. To learn more about industry safety standards, best practices or training opportunities visit their website (http://www.nuca.com/).